Getting Employee Feedback

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Many companies in the United States are not taking advantage of a key resource – their employees.  A recent survey has shown that companies are not taking the time to listen to feedback or ideas from their workers.

Nearly half of the companies contacted in a recent study did not use employee surveys.  Moreover, almost half of the companies that did use surveys did nothing with the responses.  The area of the country where employee surveys were most prevalent was the South, where 57 percent of the companies contacted reported using the surveys.  However, companies in the north central region of the country, which includes Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas, were the least likely to do anything with employee surveys.  A little more than half reported taking any action connected to the surveys.  The West had the lowest rate of employee surveys, at 42 percent.

Human resource specialists highlighted the importance of conducting such surveys.  These instruments allow workers’ voices to be heard, and to enable them to become part of a company’s strategic vision.  The surveys can be especially important during a period of change, which naturally heightens uncertainty.  Offering employees a chance to give feedback prior to a change increases their engagement in the change and the success of the company.

Studies have shown a close connection between a favorable perception that employees have of their jobs and a company’s use of responses to employee surveys.  Many employees felt that the actions taken by the company in response to employee feedback created better working conditions.

A number of the same issues continually surfaced in employee responses to surveys at different companies.  Salaries ranked as the number one issue connected to employee dissatisfaction.  Workers are especially concerned about the compression in pay between new and more senior employees.  Employees also felt that there should be more recognition of performance in making pay increases.  Workers also felt that the cost of health insurance was too high, especially for prescription drug programs.  Another concern was a top-heavy organizational structure, where there were too many people giving orders and not enough people to carry them out.

They also felt that there needs to be better communication between workers and management, and that management needs to be more readily available.  Other feedback centered on the human resource department, which was perceived as being unresponsive to employee questions or problems.  Employees also felt that workloads were too heavy or departments were not staffed at proper levels.  Favoritism was cited as another issue, as was the cleanliness of the work environment.

When you need reliable professionals skilled in the construction, engineering and architecture industries for your Washington, DC-area company, contact RealStreet Staffing. We can source, vet and place workers in temporary, temp-to-hire and direct hire assignments. We look forward to hearing from you.

Many companies in the United States are not taking advantage of a key resource – their employees.  A recent survey has shown that companies are not taking the time to listen to feedback or ideas from their workers.

Nearly half of the companies contacted in a recent study did not use employee surveys.  Moreover, almost half of the companies that did use surveys did nothing with the responses.  The area of the country where employee surveys were most prevalent was the South, where 57 percent of the companies contacted reported using the surveys.  However, companies in the north central region of the country, which includes Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas, were the least likely to do anything with employee surveys.  A little more than half reported taking any action connected to the surveys.  The West had the lowest rate of employee surveys, at 42 percent.

Human resource specialists highlighted the importance of conducting such surveys.  These instruments allow workers’ voices to be heard, and to enable them to become part of a company’s strategic vision.  The surveys can be especially important during a period of change, which naturally heightens uncertainty.  Offering employees a chance to give feedback prior to a change increases their engagement in the change and the success of the company.

Studies have shown a close connection between a favorable perception that employees have of their jobs and a company’s use of responses to employee surveys.  Many employees felt that the actions taken by the company in response to employee feedback created better working conditions.

A number of the same issues continually surfaced in employee responses to surveys at different companies.  Salaries ranked as the number one issue connected to employee dissatisfaction.  Workers are especially concerned about the compression in pay between new and more senior employees.  Employees also felt that there should be more recognition of performance in making pay increases.  Workers also felt that the cost of health insurance was too high, especially for prescription drug programs.  Another concern was a top-heavy organizational structure, where there were too many people giving orders and not enough people to carry them out.

They also felt that there needs to be better communication between workers and management, and that management needs to be more readily available.  Other feedback centered on the human resource department, which was perceived as being unresponsive to employee questions or problems.  Employees also felt that workloads were too heavy or departments were not staffed at proper levels.  Favoritism was cited as another issue, as was the cleanliness of the work environment.

When you need reliable professionals skilled in the construction, engineering and architecture industries for your Washington, DC-area company, contact RealStreet Staffing. We can source, vet and place workers in temporary, temp-to-hire and direct hire assignments. We look forward to hearing from you.

A career in construction administration and management can be (and for me has been) one of constant transition. It’s rather common that employment with a given company starts and finishes with each successive project; you’re a new hire as it’s just getting “out of the ground,” then finished and looking for a new project (and Read More…

Greg Wangler, Pentagon Construction Management Division

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