Are You Satisfied With Your Job?

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It’s 4 p.m. on a Friday. You’re sitting in a meeting that seems to be going nowhere. You still have another three hours worth of work left at your desk. “So much for getting out of here at a decent time,” you think to yourself.

We’ve all been in the situation where we start to question the point of spending so much time and energy at our job. However, if you start having these thoughts more frequently, it’s important to ask yourself some questions to find out if you’re truly happy at your job or if you should jump ship. Take some time to reflect on the questions below.

Do You Enjoy Going to Work?
Do you look forward to going to work, or does each day become more of a struggle to get out of bed? If you haven’t been up late or out on the town, and you have to drag yourself out of bed, this could be a sign that you’re feeling burnt out or unfulfilled in your job. Good working conditions and inspiring office morale make it much easier to get up for work in the morning.

What are the Pros and Cons of Your Job?
Get out a pen and paper and draw two columns. In the first column, list all the things you enjoy about your job. In the second column, jot down what you dislike about your job. Now take a few minutes to analyze your lists. Do the values and rewards of the likes outweigh the dislikes? If not, it may be time to consider looking for a position that is more satisfying.

Does Your Job Align with Your Strengths and Values?
When interviewing for your position, you were more than likely asked about your strengths and weaknesses. You were hired because your manager believed your strengths were a good match for the role. Are you using those strengths in your day-to-day tasks? Studies show that employees are happiest in roles that align with their strengths and values. If you’re an extroverted engineer, it’s likely that you’d be less happy doing data analysis at a computer than in a position that has you out in the field. The same is true for values. It’s much more rewarding to work for a company with a mission that you’re passionate about, than one that supports issues you don’t agree with.

Is Your Job Challenging?
If you’re performing the same routine day after day, you’re more likely to suffer from burnout. Everyone needs to experience challenges and rewards in their work. If you’re starting to feel bored with your job, try asking for more responsibilities. Taking on additional duties will increase your sense of purpose and expand your skill set.

Does Your Boss Value You?
Your boss’s leadership qualities play a critical role in your job satisfaction. Does your boss serve as a mentor and assist your career development? Or do they overload you with their work and undermine you? If your boss isn’t making the initiative to respect you, it’s very hard to be happy and respect them in return.

Is This Job Leading You Where You Want To Go?
Your answer to this question is the most important of all. Evaluate your long-term career goals. Where do you see yourself in one? Five? Ten years? Is your current job on the path to those places? Or is it a dead end? If there is room for learning opportunities and career growth, then some of the boring aspects of your job are worth weathering through. Looking at the big picture will allow you to see if your present position is leading to long-term satisfaction.

 By taking the time to analyze your answers to these questions, you can achieve better clarity of how satisfied you are with your job. If you do find that you are unhappy in your job, know that you have options. There’s no reason to feel ashamed for wanting to change jobs in pursuit of career goals.

If you feel stuck about what to do next, the recruiters at RealStreet Staffing are here to help. We specialize in matching experienced construction and engineering professionals with rewarding career opportunities. Browse our open positions and Contact Us today to start laying the foundation for a better career.

A career in construction administration and management can be (and for me has been) one of constant transition. It’s rather common that employment with a given company starts and finishes with each successive project; you’re a new hire as it’s just getting “out of the ground,” then finished and looking for a new project (and Read More…

Greg Wangler, Pentagon Construction Management Division

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